Reports

How does HubSpot count the number of contacts and customers from ads?

Last updated: April 30, 2018

Applies to:

Ads
Ads add-on
Marketing Hub
marketing-basic-pro-enterprise
Basic, Professional, Enterprise

Attribution models define how your marketing assets and channels receive credit for their contribution to converting strangers into customersHubSpot's ads tool uses a last touch attribution model to calculate ad conversions.

A new contact is attributed to one of your ads when a click on that ad led to the web session where the visitor converted via a form for the first time. This needs to be the conversion that creates them as a contact as well. For example, if a contact is created via an offline source in January and then clicks an ad and fills out their first form in March, they are not counted as a new contact in your ads tool because they already existed prior to making their first form submission.

In the case of Facebook lead ads, if the lead ad submission was the contact's first form submission, the contact will be attributed to the ad. A session is an uninterrupted period of time interacting with your website. 

In order to track conversions using the HubSpot Ads add-on:

  • The HubSpot tracking code must be installed on the page to which your ad directs users. HubSpot pages include the tracking code by default; if you're using an external landing page, be sure the HubSpot tracking code is installed.
  • You must use a HubSpot Form, Collected Form, Lead Flow, or the HubSpot Forms API to capture submissions on your website or landing pages.

Examples of how the ads add-on and sources determine attribution

The user flows outlined below illustrate how new contacts will be reflected in your sources report and the ads add-on.

  • Sources attributes the source of a customer based on how they were tracked on your site for the very first time.
  • The New Contacts column in HubSpot's ads tool displays the number of contacts who first converted on a form during a web session (or Facebook lead ad interaction) whose source was a click on that ad.

1. Organic: No ads involved

A visitor finds your blog via organic search, and interact with your website content without interacting with any ads. In this example, the sources report will credit your blog content as the original source for this customer.

ads-update-scenario-1

 

2. Paid: Different types of ads involved

In this scenario, a Google AdWords ad brought the customer to your site originally, but the Facebook ad is what led them to the session where they converted and became a customer. The sources report will credit Paid Search as the source of this customer. The ads add-on will credit the Facebook Ad with the conversion.

ads-update-scenario-2

 

3. Organic and Paid: Ad contributes to the first website interaction, but not the session that led to the conversion.

In this example, a Facebook ad brought the customer to your site originally, but it does not contribute directly to the conversion. The sources report will credit Paid Social - Facebook for this customer. The ads add-on will not credit the Facebook ad since it did not lead to the session where they converted.

ads-update-scenario-3

 

4. Organic and Paid: Ad contributes to the conversion session, but not the first interaction with your website.

In this example, a social post brought the customer to your site originally, but a Google AdWords ad ultimately led to the web session where they converted and became a customer. The sources report will credit Social as the source of this customer. The ads add-on will credit AdWords for bringing in the new contact.

ads-update-scenario-4

 

For a summary of the information and examples outlined above, you can reference this chart.

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